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New Zealand’s Stone Weta – Genuine Cryogenics

The Mountain Stone Weta is the subject of the fourth release in a row from BBC Earth relating to New Zealand. They’re on quite a roll when it comes to short clips about my country, which I’m loving of course. There are more than seventy species of weta in New Zealand, some more common than others. According to Wikipedia, they belong to the families Anostostomatidae and Rhaphidophoridae, though... read more

The Carniverous Giant Powelliphanta Snail

Nobody loves me Everybody hates me I’m going down the garden to eat worms … That’s the children’s poem that came to mind when I saw this video. It’s of Powelliphanta snail, a rare giant snail that’s native to New Zealand. The Powelliphanta snail is carniverous, and mostly eats worms – “sucking them down like spaghetti”. They also eat slugs from time to... read more

Kiwi Courtship – The Female Takes Charge

BBC Earth has done it again – given us another wonderful video of native New Zealand fauna. A couple of days ago there was a special video of Tuatara hatching. This time it’s the brown kiwi. The kiwi of course is the endangered flightless bird New Zealanders get their nickname from. We also gave the name to a fruit – the Chinese gooseberry (genus – actinidia). Given anti-Chinese... read more

Russian Orthodox Church Values Are Now the Values of All Russia – and the US Right Too!

There are two threads to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s disruption of Western democracies. One is to make sure that democratic government as a political system appears unstable. Thus, he makes it seem like countries are better off with some form of totalitarian government such as he represents. Putin has been pushing this idea throughout the countries of the former Soviet bloc for some time. A... read more

Amazing Video: Hatching Tuatara

I subscribe to BBC Earth on YouTube, which never disappoints in its offerings. Today the selection was especially exciting – video of hatching tuatara from inside the burrow. Tuatara, of course, can only be found in New Zealand, and are the last living dinosaur. (Note: There is no “s” in Maori. All nouns are both singular and plural.) I saw an adult tuatara in real life about ten years... read more

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